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Posted - 17-08-2017

Collections / Research

Thomas Stephens Letters: Transcripts now available online

As part of a Leverhulme Trust funded project on Thomas Stephens of Merthyr Tydfil at the University of Wales Centre for Celtic Studies, transcripts of over 400 letters sent to the Chemist of Merthyr Tydfil who fuelled a revolution in Welsh historical scholarship are now available online. Team members Marion Löffler and Adam Coward, whose aim is to rediscover Thomas Stephens and re-establish his work, have decided to make the first fruits of its research available to the public in this way.
Thomas Stephens’s voluminous archive was donated to the National Library of Wales in 1916, and most of the letters to him were bound in two volumes, Letters A-M (NLW MS 964i-iiE) and Letters M-W (NLW MS 965i-iiE), 1840-1876. The Library’s website therefore seemed the natural home for our transcripts of letters sent to Merthyr from Australia, America, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Scotland, Switzerland and Wales, but which have long found a permanent home in Aberystwyth.
Are you are interested in Merthyr Tydfil and Welshmen in Australia, Welsh Victorian scholarship and druids, cromlechs and antiquarians, or the eisteddfod, Unitarians and European scholarly connections? Would you like to read letters by Victorian luminaries like Augusta Hall (Lady Llanofer), Walter Davies (Gwallter Mechain), Harry Longueville Jones, Thomas Price (Carnhuanawc) and Hersart de la Villemarqué? Then click on these links to the manuscripts and the transcripts:

HAVE A LOOK AT THE PROJECT HERE: Knowledge Transfer and Social Networks: European Learning and the Revolution in Welsh Victorian Scholarship

Marion Löffler Dipl.Päd. Dr.Phil. FRHS
Reader University of Wales CAWCS, Knowledge Exchange and Social Networks
Assistant Editor Dictionary of Welsh Biography
Head of Graduate Studies

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A blog about the work and collections of the National Library of Wales.

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