Blog

Posted - 08-10-2019

Collections / Events

Smartify at The National Library of Wales

 

 

In early 2018, to coincide with the launch of the Kyffin Williams: Behind the Frame exhibition, the Library began collaborating with Smartify, a company who had developed a smartphone app for use with in-house exhibitions in museums, galleries and libraries worldwide.

It is an app that allows visitors to scan items on display at the Library with their smartphone to receive further information about it or about the creator of the work. The app is simple to use and free to download from the iOS and Google Play store. What is special about the app is that it gives you context surrounding the item and therefore enhances the users’ experience.After scanning an item, it is possible to save it in a personal gallery so that you can view the digital image or read about the item once you get home.

One of the Library’s items featured on the app is the original copy of the Welsh National Anthem ‘Hen Wlad fy Nhadau’. After scanning an opening in this manuscript, not only will you be able to view interpretive information about the item but you will also have the opportunity to listen to the first known audio recording in Welsh, when the singer Madge Breese was recorded by the Gramophone Company, singing the anthem on 11 March 1899. The app certainly offers our visitors a new and interactive experience in today’s digital world!

Since the Library began collaborating with Smartify almost two years ago we continue to increase the number of items from the Library’s collections that are included on the app and ensure that all the information about the items is available in Welsh and English.

Next time you visit the Library remember to look out for any items on display with the Smartify logo beside them and give the app a go!

For further information on how to use the app go to: www.library.wales/smartify

 

Bethan Rees

Digital Access

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Posted - 07-10-2019

Collections

Why is there a tree on Rhodri Morgan’s head?

Many of you will be familiar with the point in life where you first see things which were part of your childhood in a museum. Collecting an archive which documents events, campaigns and people which you remember; you feel a bit older than you do but there is something special about re-living those events, often from a different perspective.

Mumph’s cartoons fed my teenage interest in politics. I looked forward to reading the Just William cartoon strip in the Western Mail on Saturday morning which followed the adventures of Secretary of State for Wales, William Hague. The portrait of Hague as a schoolboy in shorts and with a map of Wales upside down on the wall in his office may have been a bit harsh, but it did reflect the feeling that the job of Welsh Secretary had a low status in the cabinet, and the resentment that MPs with no connection to Wales had been appointed to the job. Sir Wyn Roberts’ role appeared to be to try to educate the Secretary of State on the issues of the day, but usually without success!

Mumph’s portrait of William Hague’s successor Ron Davies was very different. The strip was re-named The One Ronnie, with comedy connotations, but Ron Davies himself was portrayed as a gangster with dark glasses and a white suit with Minister Jon Owen Jones looking like a version of Frankenstein’s monster. In 1998 it was Alun Michael’s turn to star in the St Michael cartoon strips. This time the portrayal was heavily based on the idea that Alun Michael was parachuted in to the job by Tony Blair, so he always wore a parachute and was sometimes almost invisible except for his glasses. Peter Hain was portrayed wearing rollers and Rhodri Morgan with a tree growing out of the top of his head. When Rhodri Morgan had a hair cut, the tree was removed, but the stump remained, causing a great deal of confusion to a university friend which was only explained when I found an appropriate picture of the First Minister to make the comparison!

With the opening of the National Assembly opposition politicians made more appearances; Dafydd Wigley, Mike German and Rod Richards –  usually with an English flag in his hat.

On one level cartoons like this are quite light-hearted, depending on emphasises physical features, mannerisms or character, but they reflect the political zeitgeist in a way that other media often fail to. The exaggerated features are often based on the way the public, or sections of the public at least, see them. If they’re not, the characters don’t really work. The cartoons record important events in a visually accessible way including the discussions over the Cardiff Bay Opera House, weapons, education, health and elections and the first decade of devolution.

Taking this collection into the Library is very exciting. Mumph cartoons are at least partially responsible for my interest in politics, and so they’re indirectly responsible for me being the political archivist. Digitising and making these cartoons available will hopefully spark more interest in the field, although it is hard for me to think of them as a historical resource. This is an expensive business and we’d appreciate any help towards the costs via our Collections Fund.

Those Saturday mornings reading Just William feel like a long time ago now.

Rob Phillips
The Welsh Political Archive

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Posted - 27-09-2019

Collections / Story of Wales

Tryweryn masterpiece inspires a new generation to discuss its history

This post is a part of the Story of Wales series, which looks at different aspects of Welsh history, and how today’s Wales remembers, and shapes it. Subscribe to the blog on the right to ensure you don’t miss any posts.

Every year, as part of the Education Service’s Outreach programme, a Masterpiece in Schools Day is held, when an original item from the Library’s art collection is taken to a school somewhere in Wales to be the focus of an educational workshop. In the last three years William Turner’s painting of Dolbadarn Castle has visited a school in Llanberis, and a series of Kyffin Williams’ artworks were taken to schools in Dyffryn Nantlle and Bro Lleu in Penygroes. These events are important because they are excellent examples of how the National Library’s collections can inspire a younger audience, and help them to learn about and interpret works of art and the history associated with them.

This year, guided by Sculpture Masterpieces in Schools Art UK (a charity aiming to promote works of art held by public bodies in Britain), we invited Ffederasiwn Cysgod y Foel – which includes Ysgol Bro Tryweryn, Frongoch and Ysgol Ffridd y Llyn, Cefnddwysarn – to participate in a project that focussed on one of the National Library’s most significant sculptures, Cofeb Tryweryn by John Meirion Morris. The sculpture was created with the intention of commissioning a full size version (30 feet tall) on the shore of Llyn Celyn to commemorate the drowning of the Tryweryn valley in the 1960s.

It was decided to invite Iola Edwards, a local artist and daughter of John Meirion Morris, to lead a session for pupils in Years 5 and 6. She visited the National Library to search our collections for artworks inspired by the story of Capel Celyn, which, alongside her father’s sculpture, would be used to prepare and provide suitable activities for the workshop.

On Thursday, 12 September, the sculpture was taken to the Bala area to be the focus for the day’s art workshop. The day began with an opportunity for the children of both schools to see the sculpture during the morning service.

To give some background to the memorial’s history, Iola showed the pupils some photographs taken by Geoff Charles. They tell the story of the drowning of Capel Celyn village, and the vigorous protesting that occurred in opposition to the plan.

The pupils’ first task was to study the sculpture’s form and make sketches of it, so that they could appreciate the dynamic shape of the bird reaching up from the water. They worked in charcoal that enabled them to leave a bold mark that flowed easily.

The children were given the opportunity to study the memorial very closely, and to see the detailed faces in the bird’s feathers. They discussed the feelings of the villagers that these faces represent, their sadness and their fears, all protesting against what was happening to them. After lunch the children went on to make 3D figures from paper showing faces shouting and screaming about the injustice suffered.

A part of the workshop looked at the village of Capel Celyn and the community that was lost under the water. Using their design skills, the pupils created an image of the village’s buildings, and made a collage of scenes of the area and the people using Geoff Charles’ photographs.

The last part of the workshop involved the pupils discussing how we remember the history of Tryweryn, and the iconic wall that stands near Llanrhystud in Ceredigion. Using the screen printing process, the children recreated the graffiti that has now been replicated at many sites across Wales.

This year’s Masterpiece in Schools Day was an opportunity for pupils to learn about and commemorate events that occurred a stone’s throw away from Ysgol Bro Tyweryn over half a century ago, in the presence of a sculpture created especially to commemorate the history. Under the guidance of Iola Edwards, the sculpture inspired a group of children to develop new art skills and create a mural as their own memorial to an extremely important event in the modern history of Wales.

Related Links

Rhodri Morgan
Education Service Manager

Posted - 23-09-2019

Collections

The Drunken Rector of Llansantffraid

We are aware that this post may offend the sensibilities of some readers on two counts. Firstly it shows a member of the clergy in an unflattering light and secondly it contains a suggestion of ‘strong language’ in today’s parlance. However unpalatable you may find the content, you cannot argue with the provenance, which is a real historical document in the Wynnstay estate records .

The tale concerns Edmund Hall, rector of Llansanffraid in Montgomeryshire. In 1647 he was the subject of a case brought before Edward Vaughan and his fellow JPs at ‘The Red Castle’ (Powis Castle). Statements asserted that Edmund Hall was A quarelous person, a lewd liver and producer of causeles (causeless) suits amongste his neighboures as appeareth by these articles following….

Mr Hall was said to have commenced a lawsuit in the Court of the Exchequer against Walter Griffithes, following a persecution campaign for the non-payment of tithes which he had imposed unfairly on his hapless neighbour.  In addition, he disregarded his legal and moral obligation to observe every fast day and insteade of preaching upon the last day in August last 1647, hee the said Mr Hall tooke his recreacion by playing most of the said day att Chiffleboarde (shuffleboard) in the house of Edward Harry in the said parish.

 

 

On the next fast day, instead of preaching, he was found to be drinking at an alehouse and was confronted by one of his parishioners:

One John Powell of the said parish, demanding of the said Mr Hall att the said alehouse whether hee would preach that day, hee the said Mr Hall in a drunken humor said to the said Powell that if hee would not hould his tounge that hee would whipp his... [you can guess!].

Likewise, on the next fast day, the rector was playing bowls. It was alleged that upon the previous Whitsuntide he was very drunke att the house of one Richard Ashley in Dythur insomuch that he could not substancially stand to make water in a chamber pott but reeled about the roome.

At Welshpool in the house of Maurice Lloyd, far into the night he was desperatly bent (beinge farr in drinke)  and allegedly he challenged one of the company to a fight, offering five shillings to anyone who would duel with him.

Intriguingly, the statement is accompanied by another document, signed by several respectable citizens of the rector’s previous parish at Montgomery, a testament to his blameless life, sober, worthy [of] his calling, free from scandal….laborious in preaching his doctrine, being sound, orthodox, free from heresy….

Which story was true? Did the rector of Llansanffraid really behave in such a disgraceful manner? Or was the case fabricated by someone who held a deeply-felt grudge against him?  It raises the question of how legal cases were constructed and presented to the magistrates’ courts in the seventeenth century. Such is the perennial fascination of our work.

 

Reference: Wynnstay estate records JA1/3

 

Hilary Peters
Assistant Archivist

[Post updated 21 October 2019]

Posted - 13-09-2019

Collections / News / Story of Wales

The Dictionary of Welsh Biography

This post is a part of the Story of Wales series, which looks at different aspects of Welsh history, and how today’s Wales remembers, and shapes it. Subscribe to the blog on the right to ensure you don’t miss any posts.

Developing an interactive timeline

Wales is a small but proud nation, a nation which has contributed more than its fair share of reformers, inventors and innovators to society. From Aneurin Bevan’s NHS to Edward George Bowen’s development of Radar, Wales’ contribution to technology and civilisation as a whole, should not be underestimated. And lets not forget, Wales too has entertained us with sporting greats, actors like Richard Burton and a plenitude of musical talent.

The Dictionary of Welsh Biography has for many years recorded the lives of our most celebrated people, so that we never forget their contribution to Wales and the world. Since 2004 all these biographies have been available bilingualy on the Dictionary of Welsh Biography website, and it’s regularly updated with new entries – over 5000 and counting.

Portraits of People in the Dictionary of Welsh Biography from Wikidata

In recent years, in a bid to make this resource as open and accessible as possible, the National Library has been sharing the data behind the website openly to Wikidata – a lesser known sister of the one and only Wikipedia, designed for sharing information as data, rather than prose, freely and openly with the world. Like Wikipedia anyone can edit and improve the data in Wikidata and we now have a rich resource of data about our 5000 VIPs. Wikidata lets us plot birthplaces on a map, it lets us connect data about people’s education with data for the schools and universities they attended, and we can see which other institutions hold relevant records, like portraits or archives.

The birth place of everyone in the Dictionary of Welsh Biography. Explore      –      A map plotting the journeys taken by Welsh Missionaries, using Wikidata.

Our volunteer team has also been busy using the Dictionary of Welsh Biography to create Wikipedia articles for the people, so that we effectively have two versions of every article – one a peer reviewed and carefully managed historical record, and the other, a community managed, constantly evolving article which anyone can contribute to and reuse freely.

Following the launch of a new website for the Dictionary of Welsh Biography last year, we secured funding to work with developers to add a new and exciting feature. Using the enriched data from Wikidata, and thousands of digital images from the library collections, we are developing an interactive timeline which will allow users to explore all 5000 people in the dictionary chronologically. Click on a person on the timeline and you will be able to see the relevant Dictionary of Welsh Biography entry and the Wikipedia article.

An early version of the timeline currently being developed

What’s more, the timeline will allow users to filter the records based on where they were born, where they were educated, their occupation and more. And these filters can be used in combination, so if you only want to see all the Footballers born in Aberdare, that’s fine! The Library has also carefully curated a timeline of important events in Welsh history which can be overlayed on the timeline to give more context to the lives of these people.

This level of interaction and customisation will help bring the dictionary of Welsh Biography to life. It will be easier than ever before to search and discover the lives of our most important citizens – the people who helped shape the story of Wales.

The timeline should be live later this year.

Jason Evans

National Wikimedian

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Posted - 10-09-2019

Collections / Events / News / News and Events / Research

The WiciLlên project

Sharing data and information about Welsh literature with the world

The National Library of Wales working in partnership with Menter Iaith Môn for a second time has secured a grant from the Welsh Government for the WiciLlên project, in order to deliver an ambitious project focused on openly sharing information about Welsh literature on the Wikimedia projects.

The project will consist of two main strands. Firstly the National Library will begin sharing a huge dataset of all books of Welsh interest ever published in Wales. This dataset contains information about nearly half a million books, their authors and publishers.

A visualization of linked open data for Welsh interest books published by the University of Wales Press

As part of the WiciLlên project the first 50,000 of those records will be enriched and shared as linked open data on Wikidata. The data will be searchable and reusable in dozens of languages, including Welsh. This will improve access to this important dataset, help improve citations on Wikipedia and provide opportunities for developers and researchers wishing to re-use the data.

The second strand of the project will focus on improving content on the Welsh Wikipedia. The National Library will deliver a Hackathon event and a series of Wikipedia editathons, whilst Menter Môn’s Wikipedian in Residence will deliver events for school children of different ages.

Wikipedia editing events held recently by Menter Iaith Môn and the National Library of Wales

Nia Wyn Thomas, who heads Menter Iaith Môn said: “It’s a privilege, as always, to work with Wikimedia UK and the National Library to enrich open content in Welsh through the skilled hands of Anglesey’s children. Over the period of the collaboration, we are proud of the work that has been achieved, and the impact of the work around developing children’s digital competency through the medium of Welsh, be it their first, or second language. The influence of the work on the development of the Welsh language is also great, in a field where the language is not always seen as progressive”

The project has already started and will run until March 2020.

Jason Evans

National Wikimedian

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Posted - 02-08-2019

Story of Wales

Welsh Identity, Symbols and the National Eisteddfod

This post is a part of the Story of Wales series, which looks at different aspects of Welsh history, and how today’s Wales remembers, and shapes it. Subscribe to the blog on the right to ensure you don’t miss any posts.

 

Dragons, harps, costumes and flowers: they all have something to tell us about the development of Welsh identity!

These symbols came to be essential ingredients when advertising anything ‘Welsh’, such as national events and traditional produce. Take, for example, Wales’s National Eisteddfod. Still held annually at the beginning of August, this festival; historically centered around literature, music, art and poetry, made a profound use of ‘Welsh’ symbols in its promotions.

 

 

Pageantry, symbolism and ceremony played an important role in a Welshman’s life during the 19th and 20th centuries. These customs fed into an effort to project Welsh identity, at a time when indigenous cultures were consciously displaying their distinctiveness.

In this blog, we will use the National Eisteddfod’s official programmes to show how meaningful symbols were used to project ‘Welshness’.

 

A brief history of the National Eisteddfod

The beginning – In 1176 Lord Rhys hosted the first known ‘eisteddfod’. He held two major competitions at Cardigan Castle; one in poetry, and the other in music.

A sudden decline – Similar tournaments were held in the 15th and 16th centuries. The phrase ‘eisteddfod’ was coined during this period. However, these gatherings declined during the reign of Henry VIII.

Revival – London based Welsh societies revived the eisteddfodic tradition at the end of the 18th century. Iolo Morganwg, inventor of the famous Gorsedd of the Bards ceremonies, played an important role in reviving the eisteddfod on a national scale by associating the Gorsedd with the institution.

Formalising the ‘National Eisteddfod’ – At Denbigh in 1860 a Council and General Committee were elected to manage ‘Yr Eisteddfod’, a newborn national organization. The following year, at Aberdare, the first official ‘National Eisteddfod’ was held.

 

 

Popular symbols and their roots

The Red Dragon (Y Ddraig Goch) is one of Wales’s most recognizable symbols. Believed to have been used by King Arthur and other Celtic leaders, it symbolizes Wales’s ancient roots and represents its formidable past warriors.

The Triple harp (Y Delyn Deires) is thought of as Wales’s national instrument. Used for centuries to accompany folk-singing, dancing and poetry recitations, the triple harp epitomizes Wales’s rich literary and musical heritage.

The Welsh Dress (Y Wisg Gymreig) was largely developed during the 19th century by a devoted cultural patron called Augusta Hall, or Lady Llanover. The most basic traditional Welsh costume consisted of a red woolen cloak and a tall black hat. Hall believed that such a custom would promote Welsh industries and identity.

The Mystic Mark (Y Nod Cyfrin), the symbol /|\ was devised by Iolo Morganwg. It represents the virtues Love, Justice and Truth. The symbol was widely used on Eisteddfod programmes and represented the Gorsedd’s presence at the event. The Gorsedd was once thought of as an ancient Druidic circle which glorified Wales’s rich bardic tradition.

 

 

Reviving Welsh Culture

The use of symbols on Eisteddfod programmes can be considered within a wider context of a general effort to revive Welsh culture. It is clear that such a movement looked to the past for inspiration and encouraged Welsh people to take pride in their heritage and history.

 

Elen Haf Jones, National Library of Wales

This blog post was created as part of the Europeana ‘Rise of Literacy’ project.

Posted - 01-08-2019

Collections / Discover Sound

David Lloyd George and the National Eisteddfod of Wales

David Lloyd George was born in Manchester on the 17 January 1863 then raised in Wales, where he became one of the most famous radicals of the century. Between 1890 and 1945 he was elected Member of Parliament for Caernarfon.

Through the early years of the First World War, Lloyd George became Chancellor of the Exchequer under the leadership of Herbert Henry Asquith. In 1916 he became Secretary of State for War and later that year became the first Welsh speaking Prime Minister.

 

 

In 1916 The Times published a letter where the writer objected to the holding of the Eisteddfod during war time. In response to this article Lloyd George delivered a speech at the Aberystwyth National Eisteddfod which started:

“Why should we not sing during the war? Why especially should we not sing at this stage of the war?”

He continues to criticise the letter pointing out that Britain is still alive, not down, shattered and broken so “why should her children not sing?”

Through-out his speech Lloyd George vigorously defends the holding of the Eisteddfod during the war:

“Hundreds of wars have swept over these hills, but the harp of Wales has never yet been silenced by one of them, and I should be proud if I contributed something to keep it in tune during this war, by the holding of this Eisteddfod today.”

According to the Abergavenny Chronicle Lloyd George said, “our soldiers sing the songs of Wales in the trenches, and they hold their little Eisteddfodau behind the trenches” where he continued to read a telegram sent from the front line:

“Greetings and best wishes for success to the Eisteddfod; from Welshmen in the Field. Next Eisteddfod we shall be with you.”

On the 22 of August 1916 the newspaper ‘Y Genedl’ reported that there were over 7,000 listening to Lloyd George defending the National Eisteddfod at Aberystwyth. Newspapers reported that he remained at the festival for some time after delivering his speech and then left the town amid scenes of tremendous enthusiasm.

On the 15 February 1934 Lloyd George then recorded part of his famous ‘Why should we not sing?’ speech at the BBC studios, ready to be broadcast on the radio, for the world to hear.

 

Listen to a clip from the speech:

 

Copy of this address is kept at the National Library of Wales, and thanks to the Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project has been digitised and safely stored at the British Library’s digital repository. You can listen to the recording at the Library’s Reading Room and it will soon be available online.

Alison Lloyd Smith, Unlocking Our Sound Heritage Hub Project Manager

 

 

Posted - 19-07-2019

Collections / Story of Wales

Setting foot in Patagonia

This post is part of the Story of Wales series. Click on the Story of Wales category on the right to see all the posts. You can also subscribe to our blog on the right to receive weekly emails of all our posts.

A crowd of over 150 people on the deck of a ship surveyed the land that is to be their new home. It was Thursday 27 July 1865. The Mimosa had dropped anchor at last and the settlers waited eagerly to set foot in Patagonia.

It was almost exactly two months since they had begun their voyage from Liverpool docks, and it was a wonder that the venture had come this far. After years of negotiation with the government in Buenos Aires, the intention had been for them to sail to Patagonia aboard the Halton Castle, a ship twice the size of the Mimosa. It failed to return from its previous voyage and new arrangements had to be made. The settlers – individuals, couples and families from places such as Mountain Ash, Aberdare, Rhosllanerchrugog and Ffestiniog as well as Liverpool and Birkenhead – waited a month while the Mimosa was prepared for the journey.

As for the voyage itself, it began with stormy weather as they left Liverpool, there were strong winds on the way and other days when the sea was calm and the sun was scorching. Three children died on the ship and two were born, and there was a wedding too. Prayer meetings were held daily.

They had arrived in Patagonia despite all, and two leaders of the venture, Lewis Jones and Edwyn Cynrig Roberts, were there to greet them. Joseph Seth Jones, a 20-year-old printer from Denbigh aboard the ship, noted in his diary that Lewis Jones had come to them by boat and that he was welcomed with great joy. ‘His report was satisfactory in general and far beyond our expectations.’ he wrote, ‘He said that he had succeeded in the face of extraordinary barriers.’ The diary is a precious record of the voyage through the passengers, and it is held at the National Library.

A new chapter in the venture began with the landing in Patagonia; they would have to face another journey of 40 miles to reach the Chupat valley (later known as Dyffryn Camwy), not to mention the formidable challenge of making a new home for themselves in such arid and barren land. There would be times when the venture very nearly failed completely, but, to many people’s surprise, the Welsh language is still spoken in Patagonia today.

In terms of the number of Welsh people who went there (a total of about 4,000 by 1900), the story of the Welsh settlement in Patagonia is only a small part in the entire history of migration from Wales during the nineteenth century. Many more went to the United States and Australia, for example, and some of those people relocated again to join the community in Patagonia. But the fascination that surrounds Patagonia continues today and has brought attention to this chapter in the nation’s history. It stems from the romantic depiction of the South-American landscape, from the courage and persistence of the setles, and of course from the vision behind the venture: the desire to establish an independent state where the Welsh language was the primary medium for all aspects of life, including law, politics, education and trade. The ambition of the venture, both practically and ideologically, was both controversial and wondrous then as it is today.

The Library has materials available online to help you to discover more about the story of the Welsh in Patagonia. There is a selection of the 25 most important manuscripts relating to Patagonia, among them the diary of Joseph Seth Jones. There is also a list of books and articles on the Welsh settlement in Patagonia.

Dafydd Tudur, National Library of Wales

Posted - 18-07-2019

Collections / Discover Sound

Listening Bench

The National Heritage Lottery Fund’s Unlocking Our Heritage project aims to protect the UK’s unique and rare sound collections. The British Library and the 10 national hubs will digitize 160,000 audio items, catalog 470,000 recordings, and look at the rights of 100,000 items.

The National Library of Wales will digitise audio collections from Wales, in order to protect and create access to the files. These sound recordings will be used in learning and engagement activities, and will raise the profile of the UK Sound Archives collections. By the end of 2021 more people will be engaged with audio material and a new website will enable listeners to listen and explore a selection of online recordings.

Through the generosity and kindness of the Friends of the National Library of Wales we have received a donation of a listening bench which will enable us to take these digital recordings on a tour of Wales. A selection of audio clips will be played on the bench at different locations over the next few years.

 

 

The Reverend Canon Enid Morgan, Chair of the Friends of the National Library of Wales, said:

The Friends are delighted to present this lovely Audio Bench as a gift to the Library. We are proud that over the years we have been able to help the Library in a variety of ways to add and care for its collections and this project which aims to digitize Welsh audio collections in order to protect and create access to them is a key part of our history as Welsh people.

Before the bench begins its journey it can be seen here on the front lawn of the National Library. Clips of interviews and music are played by Dylan Baines, Ectogram, Malcolm Gwyon, Meibion ​​Mwnt, Tecwyn Ifan, Blew and Plethyn. These artists were originally recorded for Radio Cymru sessions, with the majority unheard since the early 80s. “I would like to thank the Friends of the National Library of Wales for supporting this project and for their kind donation. This is a great opportunity to release clips of sound collections from Wales that would otherwise have remained hidden. There will be an opportunity for people to listen and engage with these recordings in their local communities.” Alison Smith, Unlocking Our Sound Heritage Hub Project Manager (UOSH).

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A blog about the work and collections of the National Library of Wales.

Due to the more personal nature of blogs it is the Library's policy to publish postings in the original language only. An equal number of blog posts are published in both Welsh and English, but they are not the same postings. For a translation of the blog readers may wish to try facilities such as Google Translate.

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